Compilations & reviews

SSARS 19 – Sample compilation report for omitting the statement of cash flow

Omission of cash flow statement– Compilation reports will change for organizations with fiscal years ending after December 15, 2010. Here is the modified report I will be using after the first of the year for my non-profit clients if any would choose to omit the statement of cash flow. I doubt that will happen in my client base, but wanted to make this example available to the CPA community.

Update – SSARS 19 had been replaced by SSARS 21. All the reports have been revised. See:

 

SSARS 19 – Sample compilation report for omitting substantially all disclosures

Omission of substantially all disclosures — Compilation reports will change for organizations with fiscal years ending after December 15, 2010. I have prepared a modified report for departure from GAAP.  Here is the report I will be using after the first of the year for my non-profit clients if any choose to omit all disclosures.  Please feel free to copy, but make sure you modify this based on your firm’s policies.

Update – SSARS 19 had been replaced by SSARS 21. All the reports have been revised. See:

 

What in the world are presumptively mandatory and unconditional requirements? And why does SSARS 19 talk about should and must?

What in the world are unconditional requirements and presumptively mandatory requirements?

If you provide audits to your clients, you know those terms.  If you don’t deal with audits in your firm, these are two very weird terms in the SSARSs world, newly introduced by SSARS 19These phrases have been around since SSARS 16, which was effective December 2007.  The impact hadn’t been that large because there was only SSARS 17 and 18.  These two phrases are lots more important since they show up in SSARS 19 quite frequently.

A creative way to communicate fraud prevention to your clients

As CPAs, we look for creative ways to persuade our clients to implement good internal controls.  I fear that our comments as CPAs usually fade along with all the other you-gotta’-do-this-now messages in our regulatory heavy culture.  Another approach is to explain the devastation that arises from fraud.  I have a new post at my other blog that takes this approach:  The tragedy of fraud.  …

Welcome to my new blog!

Greetings, and welcome to my new blog.  I am still blogging at Nonprofit Update, found at www.ulvog.wordpress.com.  Why the new site?  I am talking to two very different audiences: the nonprofit community and CPAs working in the attestation area.  Thus, I will split my writing between two different blogs. 

Many of the previous posts of interest to CPAs have been brought into this blog.  Some of these posts are deleted from the other blog and some are left there.  In the future, posts related to the NPO world will be at www.ulvog.wordpress.com, comments specific to the CPA community will be here, and comments of interest to both will be cross-posted.

I hope this will be of help as you keep up to date with the torrent of changes in the attestation world.  Enjoy!

SSARS 19 Review reports for NPOs

Review reports will change starting December 31, 2010.  Two sample reports follow.

Update – SSARS 19 had been replaced by SSARS 21. All the reports have been revised. See:

SSARS 19 Compilation reports for NPOs

Compilation reports will change starting December 31, 2010.  Some sample reports follow.

Update – SSARS 19 had been replaced by SSARS 21. All the reports have been revised. See:

Financial statements should not refer to FASB documents

Just a reminder that financial statements should not be referring to FASB documents or other accounting literature, such as FIN 48, FAS 157, FAS 13, FSP 117-1 or any of those other things we know by heart.  FASB Statement #168 established the Accounting Standards Codification to replace all the accounting literature then in effect. …